How Parallels Let Me Use Windows On My Mac

 

Parallels Desktop has been quite a revelation to many people out there in the world. Personally, as a developer, it is probably the best invention that ever happened to me. Previously developing software and testing them on various platforms with different operating systems was a big-time challenge because not only was it expensive but also quite exhausting. At some point, I even considered buying a PC that supported windows and some other operating systems like Ubuntu that is until Ii came across parallels Desktop for Mac. I can now develop and test applications and software on any platform, hell, even on Windows XP.

What is Parallels Desktop?

Parallels Desktop is a software that allows Mac users to run Windows and other many more operating systems like Linux on a Mac, and if you are wondering which version of windows you can run, well be it Windows XP or 7 or 10 parallels Desktop has you covered go right here.

Why use Parallels Desktop?

Well, there’s just that feature or application that you desire to use, but Mac does not support it. Parallels allow you to install Windows and supported applications. The fact that it runs seamlessly alongside Mac makes it a must use. It also offers a variety of independent resolutions like 2560 *1440 for windows and the likes of Retina Display for MacOS. Since virtual machines can be set to run or launch automatically and simultaneously alongside your Mac, it allows for less time consumed by the Central processing system. The virtual machines are always ready in the background. In the latest update, you can easily control how and when the windows updates can be performed with the Maintenance tool. Other features include easy time management, file archiving, screenshots, and screen recording.

Benefits of parallels Desktop

•Sharing of files across the different platforms and virtual machines

•Sharing of storage and disk space

•Allows you to launch windows concurrently with Mac

•Use different screen resolutions of your choosing

•Ease of time management

•Use USB and Bluetooth pairings for both Mac and windows

•Secure development and testing of applications and software.

Parallels Desktop Editions

The pricing of the parallels Desktop for Mac varies depending on the features you require, and well, there are the updates. It comes in three editions that are Parallels Desktop for business, Mac, and Pro. Parallels Desktop for Business has a single license key for all its features and also central management and administration. Parallels desktop pro comes with a lot more features than the business one, but they both have a visual studio plugin. If you are a developer, you should go for Pro, and don’t worry, it is worth the cost.

Cost

The latest Parallels desktop 12 goes for about $79.99, which covers both download and the use license. You can also go for an annual subscription package of about $79 renewable yearly. There are also subscriptions for both student editions and business editions. There’s the standard edition for $80 one time subscription. For developers, the Pro edition will suit your needs, although a little bit more expensive ($99.99) before the discount.

Features

•Flexible with all versions of Windows, Linux, macOS.

•Configured and optimized for windows updates and MacOS Catalina 10.15

•You can connect your devices with Windows like USB and Firewire. It also allows for the pairing of Bluetooth devices, printers, and stylus, which work seamlessly with both Windows and macOS.

•Independent screen resolutions for different platforms

•Enables instant access to the virtual machines on the toolbar.

•Allows use of Boot camp installation method

•Increased security features, uniform license key, and central management.

•Easy windows updates management

•Sharing of storage space and files across different virtual machines

•Supports retina display on windows

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